Marketing Blog

Marketing Blog

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Vitamin D: A Quick Guide to This Nutrient of Concern

Published on May 15, 2019

With the new nutrition label regulations, we’re looking at big changes in vitamin D labeling—including mandatory nutrition labeling and a doubling of the Daily Value. Although the “sunshine vitamin” can be produced in the skin with sufficient sun exposure, lifestyle factors like less time outdoors and widespread use of sunscreen mean that Americans are struggling to get enough vitamin D. Read on to learn how much vitamin D we actually need, the best food sources, and which labeling changes impact this nutrient of concern. 

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Iron: A Quick Guide to This Nutrient of Concern

Published on May 13, 2019

Here’s everything you need to know about the best sources of iron, how much iron we actually need, and how to label iron under the new nutrition label regulations

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Vitamin C is Now a Voluntary Label Nutrient--Here's Why

Published on Mar 28, 2019

While food and beverage manufacturers are gearing up for the new nutrition label compliance deadlines, many still have questions about why these changes are even necessary. Here we discuss why the FDA has decided to change the labeling status of vitamin C from mandatory to voluntary—even though vitamin C has been identified as an underconsumed nutrient in America.

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Potassium: The Essential Guide to this Nutrient of Concern

Published on Mar 25, 2019

Did you know that the vast majority of Americans are not consuming adequate amounts of potassium? Less than 2% are meeting the recommendations for potassium,1 and the average intake is only 55% of the recommended amount.2 Since potassium helps regulate things like heartbeat and blood pressure, it’s no wonder the FDA is making potassium a mandatory label nutrient on the new nutrition label. Here’s everything you need to know about this vital nutrient.

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The Beauty of Biotin

Published on Jan 23, 2019

Biotin is a stable B vitamin that functions in the metabolism of macronutrients such as proteins, carbohydrates, and proteins. Other names for biotin include vitamin B7, vitamin H, or coenzyme R. Biotin is a coenzyme involved in the creation of nucleic acids and fatty acids. Additionally, biotin is an important factor in the creation of fats, specifically for adequate fat production in the body. Even though biotin is responsible for the production of fat, it is not stored in the fatty tissues. In fact, biotin is a water soluble vitamin, nontoxic, and excreted from the body. Low biotin intake causes an adverse effect of fat metabolism. (1).

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High Five For Fiber

Published on Jan 21, 2019

The United States population consumes well below the recommended amounts of fiber (1). The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines has recognized dietary fiber as a nutrient of public health concern (2).

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What Does 4700 mg of Potassium Look Like?

Published on Oct 31, 2018

According to health professionals, getting enough potassium can reduce your risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.1 Yet most American adults are falling short of the recommended daily intake. Research suggests that consuming an optimal amount of this crucial mineral may protect against a host of ailments including cardiovascular disease, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, and kidney stones. It can help to maintain healthy blood pressure and ensure proper nerve, kidney, and heart functions. In 2016, the FDA added potassium to the list of nutrients required to be listed on a food’s nutrition panel.

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Nutrients Missing From Your Gluten-Free Diet

Published on Oct 4, 2018

Checking the nutrition label for the gluten-free certification is obviously a priority for one with Celiac Disease, however, the nutritional content is often overlooked when searching for foods without wheat, rye or barley. Few gluten-free grains are enriched or fortified with vitamins and minerals, leaving nutrient gaps in the diet and making consumers more susceptible to nutrient deficiencies. One should be on the lookout for the following nutrients if on a gluten-free diet.

The Sugar Blues

Published on Sep 28, 2018

The Dietary Guidelines of Advisory Committee (DGAC) identified added sugars as a “cross-cutting topic” of public health importance. In the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA), the recommendation was to solely to limit the intake of added sugars. For the first time, the Dietary Guidelines are putting a number on the amount of added sugars recommended for consumption. In the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines, the recommendation is to consume a maximum of 10% of daily calories as added sugars. Americans ideally should be limiting this to 4-6% of calorie intake for optimal health.

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Saturated Fat

Published on Sep 20, 2018

Fatty acids are divided into 3 different types: saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Saturated fatty acids have no double bonds, monounsaturated fatty acids have one double bonds, and polyunsaturated fatty acids have two or more double bonds. Saturated fats are solid and unsaturated fatty acids are liquid at room temperature. Foods are comprised of a combination of these fatty acids in varying amounts.